Quantcast
Follow us On YouTube Follow us On FaceBook



or
Search Language
Browse
Medical Animations
Medical Animation Titles
Custom Legal Animations
Anatomical Models
Patient Health Articles
Custom Interactive
Most Recent Uploads
Body Systems/Regions
Anatomy & Physiology
Diseases & Conditions
Diagnostics & Surgery
Cells & Tissues
Cardiovascular System
Digestive System
Integumentary System
Nervous System
Reproductive System
Respiratory System
Back and Spine
Foot and Ankle
Head and Neck
Hip
Knee
Shoulder
Thorax
Medical Specialties
Cancer
Cardiology
Dentistry
Editorial
Neurology/Neurosurgery
Ob/Gyn
Orthopedics
Pediatrics
Account
Administrator Login
The Doe Report Medical Reference Library
Print this article
Making Your Home Safe For Baby

Making Your Home Safe For Baby Your baby is on the way, and there is a lot to think about. Besides making sure that you have baby furniture and clothing for your new son or daughter, you'll want to check that your home is safe. These tips can help you cover all the safety bases.

Before you bring baby home:

  • Check the safety of your baby's crib and other baby items. Many new parents welcome hand-me-down baby items from family and friends. Although it's wise to save money, some products could be unsafe if recalled or if parts are missing or loose. Unsafe cribs and other items can put your baby's life in danger. Most brand new cribs and mattresses purchased in the United States are safe. Make sure the crib conforms to the current government safety standards. Also, check to see if hand-me-down items, such as bassinets or portable cribs, have been recalled. Check for recalls and get information on buying a safe crib and mattress at the U.S. Consumer Product Information Safety Commission web site. Or call them at 1-800-638-2772.
  • Remove pillows, blankets, and stuffed animals from the crib to prevent your baby from suffocation.
  • Check to see that smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors in your home are working. Place at least one smoke detector on each level of your home and in halls outside of bedrooms. Have an escape plan in case of fire.
  • Put emergency numbers, including poison control, near each phone. Have at least one phone in your home connected by land line. Cordless phones do not work when the power is out, and cell phone batteries can run out.
  • Make sure your home or apartment number is easy to see so fire or rescue can locate you quickly in an emergency.
  • Make sure handrails are installed and secure in stairways. Always hold the handrail when using stairs, especially when holding your baby.

Your baby will be crawling before you know it. Most babies begin crawling around six to nine months. Crawling on your hands and knees will reveal many dangers to your baby. Thinking ahead to the toddler years will help you to take care of other hazards before your baby grows and finds them first. Here are some things to do before your baby is crawling:

  • Cover all unused electrical sockets with outlet plugs.
  • Keep chords out of baby's reach. Tack up chords to vertical blinds and move furniture, lamps, or electronics to hide chords.
  • Secure furniture and electronics, such as bookcases and TVs, so they cannot be pulled down on top of your baby.
  • Use protective padding to cover sharp edges and corners, such as from a coffee table or fireplace hearth.
  • Install safety gates at the bottom and top of stairwells or to block entry to unsafe rooms.
  • Use safety latches on cabinets and doors.
  • Store all medicines, cleaning products, and other poisons out of baby's reach.
  • Remove rubber tips from doorstops or replace with one-piece doorstops.
  • Look for and remove all small objects. Objects that easily can pass through the center of a toilet paper roll might cause choking.
  • Keep houseplants out of baby's reach. Some plants can poison or make your baby sick.
  • Set you water heater temperature to no higher than 125 degrees Fahrenheit. Water that is hotter can cause bad burns.
  • Closely supervise your baby around a family pet. Pets need time to adjust to a new baby.

Sources:

Making Your Home Safe For Baby. U.S. department of Health and Human Services. http://www.womenshealth.gov/pregnancy/getting-ready/make-home-safe.cfm. Accessed May 19, 2010.



Medical/Legal Disclaimer
Copyright © 2003 Nucleus Medical Art, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Related Medical Demonstrative Evidence - click thumbnail to review.
Blue Baby Syndrome
Blue Baby Syndrome -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Premature Birth
Premature Birth -
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Ultrasound Doppler
Ultrasound Doppler -
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Normal 33 Week Baby vs. Abnormally Small Baby
Normal 33 Week Baby vs. Abnormally Small Baby -
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Breastfeeding Position
Breastfeeding Position -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Smoker Pregnant Female
Smoker Pregnant Female -
Medical Exhibit
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Figure of a Baby: Anterior View
Figure of a Baby: Anterior View -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Premature Baby
Premature Baby -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Figure of a Baby: Anterior View
Figure of a Baby: Anterior View -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Birth Stage 2
Birth Stage 2 -
Medical Animation
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Newborn Baby with Jaundice - Unisex
Newborn Baby with Jaundice - Unisex -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
Figure of a Baby: Anterior View
Figure of a Baby: Anterior View -
Medical Illustration
Add to my lightbox
Find More Like This
How do I find a personal injury lawyer in my local area?
Find a personal injury lawyer in your local area using LEGALpointer™, a national directory of U.S. attorneys specializing in personal injury, medical malpractice, workers' compensation, medical product liability and other medical legal issues. Or, click on one of the following to see attorneys in your area: Alabama (AL), Alaska (AK), Arizona (AZ), Arkansas (AR), California (CA), Colorado (CO), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Washington D.C. (DC), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Idaho (ID), Illinois (IL), Indiana (IN), Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Maine (ME), Maryland (MD), Massachussets (MA), Michigan (MI), (MN), Mississippi (MS), (MO), Montana (MT), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Nebraska (NE), Nevada (NV), New Hampshire (NH), New Jersey (NJ), New Mexico (NM), New York (NY), Ohio (OH), Oklahoma (OK), Oregon (OR), Pennsylvania (PA), Puerto Rico (PR), Rhode Island (RI), South Carolina (SC), South Dakota (SD), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Utah (UT), Virginia (VA), Virgin Islands (VI), Vermont (VT), Washington (WA), West Virginia (WV), Wisconsin (WI).












Awards | Resources | Articles | Become an Affiliate | Free Medical Images | Pregnancy Videos
Credits | Jobs | Help | Medical Legal Blog | Find a Lawyer | Hospital Marketing